Week8A-Flowers

Recently a florist joined me for a walk around our farm. While she advised me about the colors and types of flowers her customers require, I collected what was blooming.

Week8A-flowers
Since I tend to be drawn to edible scents and color, I reached for the fennel and its dreamy licorice flavor…

Week8A-flowers

Added some pyrethrum, which are the workhorses of the farm. These tiny daisies are one of the few bug repellants¬†organic farmers like us can use…

Week8A-flowers

then we moved on to these fuchsia dianthus. Yes, they’re garish showgirls but they taste great and they’ve dug in, becoming perennials where other flowers just crumple.

Week8A-flowers

No bouquet is complete without texture and shape. Who can resist a garlic scape?

Week8A-flowers

Or the snowball puff of an onion scape?

Week8A-basil

The ¬†florist professional inquired about “filler.” In her industry, it’s usually nondescript greenery used to add volume to a bouquet. On the farm, it often involves something edible and fragrant like basils.

Week8A-flowers

And I couldn’t resist popping in a few grasses because I like the way they bounce. Viola, we were done.

Week8A-flowers

My thoroughly unprofessional, mostly edible, organic bouquet left the floral expert shaking her head. Where were the long stem roses and calla lilies? “Customers want what they see in Martha Stewart and Brides magazines,” she explained with authority.

I nodded and smiled and silently gave thanks for our Flower Share members who support what grows in Austin, not in Ecuador.