CSA Spring Week2B Newsletter

For years Erin has challenged me to try no-till farming, at least as an experiment on a couple of our fields. This year, after meeting an intense, passionate farmer from Arkansas named Patrice Gros, I decided to give it a try.

The Frenchman’s detailed sharing of his 10-year experiment provided the recipe, which requires four main ingredients, two of which were available on the farm this year — massive amounts of leaves and wood chips, and a five-species cover crop I planted in the fall.

The one ingredient that makes it unsustainable right now was having to purchase compost. Lots of compost. The initial bed-making requires literally tons of organic matter and the combination of leaves, compost and mulch are the secret to keeping weeds down while also building up the critical microbial habitat that can break down all that organic matter you heap onto these raised beds.

The fourth — and most critical — ingredient is lots of hands. As in hard labor. There is no way to skimp on this requirement — making the beds, weeding, and then pulling back all the decayed vegetative material to the shoulders when you get ready to plant the next season.  

Fortunately we have had lots of volunteer help this season. I won’t even try to estimate the number of wheel barrels that were filled and emptied for just one-quarter acre.

Another incentive for going no till this year was the fact that our old Shubaru tractor had stopped running; it, too, was tired of tilling up the ground each year.

Farming no-till organically on larger plots requires special equipment and ideal conditions. But for small plots on farms that have lots of volunteer hands, this style of no-till seems is about as sustainable as it comes. But it also requires a long-term commitment. Gros has been doing no-till for 10 years now and only recently has he felt like he has created the perfect system. His organic matter during that time has increased from 1 percent to more than 8%, which is about three time what we have in our fields right now.

Last week’s pac choy is the first crop to come from these no-till beds. The mediocre results were not unexpected. The leaves and cover crop underneath the thick layer of compost did not have enough time to break down and allow the roots to penetrate into the soil below.  The plants were fairly stunted and it didn’t help that our record warm spring forced the plants to bolt several weeks early. Next season will undoubtably be more fruitful.

Like a kitchen table after a hastily prepared meal, these fields are messy, with cover crop still growing in the crooked isles and uneven rows that were laid down without the benefit of string. And as with any undercooked meal, the farmer is still chewing on what he has wrought and whether this last-minute experiment is going to take off and become the apple of his eye.

Either way, the farmer feels good that he is pushing the envelope and wishes he had listened to his wife a long time ago.

-Farmer Skip

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Swiss Chard & Lemon Ricotta Pasta

Swiss Chard and Lemon Ricotta Pasta

Serves 4

  • cups raw Swiss chard, sliced (including the stems)
  • handfuls dried spaghetti
  • strips bacon, cut into 1/4-inch slices or lardons
  • 1/2 large shallot, minced
  • Olive oil, as needed
  • 1/3 cup ricotta cheese
  • tablespoons Parmesan cheese
  • Zest from 1/2 lemon
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt, to taste
  • pinch dried red pepper flakes
  1. Bring a pot of well-salted water to a boil over high heat. Blanch the Swiss chard for 5 minutes. Scoop out the chard, and drain well, squeezing out as much of the water as possible. Chop again and set aside.
  2. Keep the pot of water boiling, and add the spaghetti noodles. Follow the directions on the packet for making the spaghetti. Drain and set aside, retaining about 1 cup of liquid from cooking the noodles.
  3. Fry bacon until just crispy. Add the shallot and saute until soft, adding olive oil if needed.
  4. Add the Swiss chard and toss well to break up the chard clumps.
  5. Combine the ricotta and Parmesan cheeses in a small bowl, and add the lemon zest, salt, and red pepper flakes. Add to the Swiss chard mixture in the saute pan and mix well.
  6. Add cooked spaghetti, and some of the pasta water as needed.
  7. Serve warm.

CSA Spring Week1A Newsletter

Welcome to the first week of the Spring/Summer CSA season. And what a great start to your culinary commitment to local organic food and small family farms. Warm weather. Nice rains. And hard-working farmers. Those are key ingredients to a bountiful harvest
and this week is a taste of delicious things to come.

I was going to delete the “Spring” part but I’m still hoping that this summer-like weather is not here for good. Last night’s storm dumped more than two inches to our river farm; the front also dropped temperatures by 10 degrees, but we are expecting highs in the 80s for the rest of the week. 

Spring. Ephemeral Spring. Where art thou?

As you may already know, Austin recorded its warmest meteorological winter (December, January, February). March will surely follow suit.  Who would guess that one of the most severe freezes we’ve had in years also arrived this winter and cut our winter season short. (Thank you, winter share members for hanging with us and returning this season!)

The good news is that we have seen an explosion in growth for the past month. Our tomato plants in the hoop house are already fruiting and we planted them only a month ago!  Cucumbers are flowering! And summer squash is only a few weeks away!

The downside to this unseasonable warmth is that the lettuce in this week’s share is on the verge of going bitter while the pac choy has started bolting. These are problems a farmer would anticipate in late April and plan/plant accordingly. Today, with climate change upon us, “accordingly” is begging for a new and revised Farmers Almanac.

Next week you can anticipate some beautiful romaine lettuce, green garlic, purple mustard greens, radishes, chard, and more. I’ll also share the results of our new venture into no-till farming and why new farming techniques are critical for a more sustainable agriculture.

-Farmer Skip

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So Much to Celebrate!

skipconnett

Ten years ago, we celebrated Farmer Skip’s 50th as we moved into the now 114-year-old Bergstrom farmhouse. The house was empty yet we were filled with anticipation.

Because when I had asked how Skip he wanted to celebrate his mid-life birthday, he said, “I want to raise my own pig on my farm and invite all my friends to celebrate.”

This request came from a man who wore a tie to work, wrote speeches at the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta and hadn’t lived on a farm in nearly forty years. While some friends suspected a mid-life crisis, I knew that this yearning was not new. The man I married would not feel complete without realizing his dream to farm, so we set the wheels in motion.

Ten years ago, there were no friends. I had been away from Austin for many years so it was my family that gathered to cut his birthday cake. Ten years ago, there was no pig and Green Gate Farms was nothing more than a rototiller and a crazy dream.

Today Skip is 60. And on Saturday we will celebrate him and the countless friends who helped create a community farm through generosity and passion. There will be a pig roast thanks to chef Tony Grasso. And there will be good news.

A year of negotiations between Green Gate Farms, Roberts Resorts — the farm property’s new owner — and the City of Austin bore fruit last week.

TBG Partners, hired by our landlord, devised a plan that will incorporate our four-acre farm into Roberts’ larger development of tiny homes, RVs and manufactured homes. This plan includes Green Gate Farms and the historic 1902 Swedish buildings – barn, farmhouse and cottages.  The drawings will be unveiled at Saturday’s Potluck Party (4-10pm).

In addition, our long-awaited desire to extend our Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) program to SNAP (a.k.a. food stamp) users has been realized thanks to the Sustainable Food Center. Did you know that 25% of Austinites qualify for SNAP? Now, these vouchers can be redeemed and doubled at our farm stand because of funding from the Double Dollar program. Be sure to tell your favorite musician, artist, teacher, military vet, Americorps worker and other SNAP users that we are hosting a sign-up party and free farm tour on June 11, 11-2 that will ensure their food budget goes twice as far.

As we look forward to another decade of feeding and growing community, a beloved CSA member has arranged for her Aztec dance troop to bless the farm.  Following this, we will gather for a Barn Hug. All hands are needed to encircle the Big Red Barnthat has provided so much fun, shelter, and service. (Anyone have a drone that can photograph this event?).

So spread the word. It’s time for new beginnings – birthdays, graduations and a hopeful
future.

Bring a friend, bring an instrument, bring a dish to share. Let’s celebrate!

Farmer Erin