Easy Kimchi

Makes approximately two twelve ounce jars.

Ingredients

2 heads Napa cabbage, chopped
2 pieces daikon radish, chopped
1 bunch scallions, chopped
4-6 cloves garlic
1-2 inch piece of ginger, peeled
1/4 – 1/2 cup  red pepper flakes, depending on how spicy you like it
1-2 tsp fish sauce optional
3-4 TBSPs sea salt
Directions
1. Trim ends of cabbage and chop any way you want – thin or thick strips is fine.  Chop the daikon radish and scallions as well.
2.  Add the salt to the vegetables and mix thoroughly.  Let sit for an hour or two.  The salt will draw out the water.  This is known as the “dry salt” method and the one I prefer.   If you don’t want to wait a few hours you can simply crush and squeeze the veggies with your hands.  Do this for a minute or two until the veggies get nice and wet from the water that is released.
3. In a food processor, blend the garlic, ginger and chili flakes into a paste.
4. Pack mixture into mason jars
5.  Press mixture firmly into the jars until the water starts rising
6.  Put the lids on and leave the jars at room temperature for 2-7 days.  Open the lids every day to release the gasses that form as a byproduct of fermentation.  If the water level rises, drain some off.  If the vegetables rise above the level of the water, pack them back under the water with your hands or the veggie stomper.
7. Taste the kimchi after 2 days.  It should taste pleasantly sour.  If not, continue to let it ferment and taste it every day until you find the taste acceptable.  Transfer to the fridge where it will continue to ferment (and the taste will change!) albeit at a much slower pace.  It will last for at least six months.

Flower CSA Returns

Our Spring Flower CSA is back! Check out our Flower CSA page to find out more about ordering these beautiful bouquets.

(Flowers will change weekly depending upon availability, so not every week will look like this gorgeous bouquet, but will always be beautiful.)

CSA Spring CSA Week3A Newsletter

Visions of Green Fields

Warm days, cool evenings, and intermittent rains bring Spring to a brilliant crescendo of color — ten shades of green splashed with wine cup red, bonnet blue, and buttercup yellow. The farmer stands in awe at nature’s exuberance, once again caught off-guard by its silent rush to dress up and burst forth into the world. Everything in flux. Nothing staying put. A wild parade of growth that marches past him as he hastily pulls his babies out of its path.

Yes, it’s that time of year again, albeit a fortnight early by most planting calendars. This week’s harvest runs the gamut from fennel steaks that barely survived the late December freeze to romaine lettuce that baked under a summer-like sun. And now comes the moment he had waited for, dreamed about in mid winter when the farm finally appeared under control and promised to follow his best laid plans. Amid swarms of harlequin bugs and regiments of Johnson Grass, the farmer unveiled the white row cover and exposed his prized possession — the most tender, leafy, unmolested row of hakurei turnips he has ever grown.

As white and luminous as the full moon that rose later that evening, those sweet orbs were washed and packed and safely stored. A small victory worthy of a good meal, exalted, hopefully, by some brilliant menu that would honor the arduous journey.

The farmer has more to share — carrots and new potatoes ready in the next week or two; squash and cucumbers on their heels; and tomatoes already the size of easter eggs. And the farmer has more to tell, like how 30 Austin creatives celebrated the new moon at the city farm last night as part of the Moon Language Story Circle* gatherings. All it took was a fire and a dozen brave artists to hold back the storms with their poetry, music and timeless stories. A quintessential Austin moment was brought forth as gracefully and magically as those delicious turnips with the can’t-spell-me name. 

Alas, however, the farmer has run out of space and time. The Spring that sprung before its time has stolen the hours as well. 

-Farmer Skip

*Feel free to attend the next full moon meeting, which will be held at Urban Roots.

HMI Presents: Open Gate at Green Gate Farms

Join us April 29, 9am-4pm  for the Green Gate Farms Day, part of HMI’s Open Gate Learning Series. Open Gates are peer-to-peer action-based learning days with short presentations and small group exercises geared for participants to share discoveries and management techniques with guidance from experienced facilitators and producers.

Since 1984, HMI has helped communities grow and thrive by educating family farmers and ranchers and pastoralists in regenerative agricultural practices that empower them to strengthen their businesses, produce healthier food, improve local wildlife habitats and protect the environment. Their mission is to educate people in regenerative agriculture for healthy land and thriving communities.

Presenters include Peggy Sechrist from Holistic Management, Skip Connett & Erin Flynn, Green Gate Farm Owners, Ronda Rutledge the Executive Director of Sustainable Food Center • Robert Maggiani from NCAT (National Center for Appropriate Technology), and Edwin Marty, a Food Policy Manager for the City of Austin.

In addition to Erin & Skip’s story and tour of the farm, there will be a wonderful in-depth discussion about the benefits and challenges of neighborhood farms. The lunch will be lovingly made by Andria Millie from Culvito Catering from pork and vegetables grown at Green Gate Farm.

Click here for more information and to sign up.
Scholarship opportunities are available.